Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th International Conference on Physics Barcelona, Spain.

Day 1 :

Conference Series Euro Physics 2020 International Conference Keynote Speaker Aghaddin Mamedov  photo
Biography:

Dr. Aghaddin Mamedov is working as a Researcher at Houston Center for Fundamental research, Houston, TX, USA.

 

 

Abstract:

Probably many scientists will be agree on the statement that nature does not distinguish difference between the laws describing different scales, such as nuclear scale interactions of quantum physics and planetary scale of relativity. These theories cannot merge to one fundamental concept to present whole nature, therefore cannot be a complete theory even if they describe different scale interactions. Nature may select only one concept, combining all kind of changes and forces, which could describe its existence and conservation laws without probability. Therefore, unification of these theories based on the concepts, applied before, such as quantum gravity, relativistic quantum theory, quantum field theory, string theory, and renormalization will not solve the problem due to the application of principles of energy conservation based on continuously differentiable function.

  • Classical physics | Condensed matter physics | Astro-particle Physics | Material physics | High energy nuclear physics | Atomic Physics | Radiation protectio
Location: London, UK

Session Introduction

Cristian Popescu

CVW Technologies, Magurele, Romania

Title: Where is gravity stored?
Biography:

Popescu Cristian has completed his studies at Polytechnical University, Energetic Faculty, Hydro department and he has finalized his PhD at the age of 33 years from Technical University of Constructions Bucharest, Romania, with specialty in hydrotechnical constructions. He has a vast experience accumulated in 8 private companies working from research-design to project management and business development for various energy projects from hydro, wind, thermal, to nuclear.

 

Abstract:

Gravity force existing in universe comes always with mass and where is mass we always have gravity. Question would be, what is generating this force and where is located exactly?

To describe this force we are going to make the assumption before the universe got created, space was flat and time was Ø (absent). Initial bigbang was so strong it curved space in every single point of the entire universe and also generated time. But if before this we have had just linear radiation and after that we had mass, then this initial explosion created mass. The question is what is mass? The formula of Einstein E=mc2 tells us mass is made of energy and light. Which means mass is radiation. But in this universe all radiation is linear and overlaps with all the other radiation, while mass is spherical with curved trajectories and can never overlap with the other mass. The reason why mass is different is because a sphere of mass has around it a reversed sphere pressing it on its surface not allowing the radiation energy mc2 stored inside the sphere from exploding

Biography:

Hind Aljaddani has completed her Ph.D. from Howard University in Washington DC on 28 July 2019. She is now an assistant professor at the University of Jeddah in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Hind interested in the selective toxic molecule from a mixture using different substrates such as Graphene Nanoribbons and Graphite. 

 

 

Abstract:

We propose a substrate designed to filter CO2 from a vapor mixture of CO2 and CH4 at room temperature. The technique combines energetic, kinetic and steric aspects of adsorption. The substrate consists of an array of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) placed over graphite. Our study is based on Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Methane is considered a spherical molecule and carbon dioxide is represented as a linear rigid body. Graphite is modeled as a continuous material, while the GNRs are approached atomistically. We explore the effect on the selectivity of the type of GNRs’ edges, the distance between GNRs and the graphite surface, and the gaps between GNRs.

For narrow gaps (∼ 7 ̊A openings), we show that the molecules of methane are blocked out, while CO2 molecules are able to diffuse and be collected in between the nanoribbons and the graphite surface. In this way the selectivity of CO2 is extremely high. For wider gaps (∼ 14 ̊A openings) we obtain high selectivity when the GNRs are placed 6 ̊A above the graphite surface. In this last case, the initial rate of adsorption of CO2 is much faster than CH4. For zigzag-edged GNRs, CO2 adsorbs 19 times faster than CH4, and for armchair-edged GNRs the relative rate of adsorption is 14. Overall we show that the filter can be optimized by controlling the gap opening between the GNRs.

 

Biography:

Abstract:

Patient dose measurement is an important tool for dose optimization and patient protection in diagnostic radiology. It is to safeguard both the medical personnel and patient from undesirable effect of radiation. The present study examines the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and effective dose of 150 patients undergoing routine lumbar spine radiographic examinations in nine health care centers consisting ten radiological units in Southern part of Nigeria. Patient dose were evaluated using mathematical equations based on exposure factors.  The  estimated mean ESAK values ranged 1.68 mGy to 12.66 mGy for lumbar spine AP and ranged from1.91 mGy to 10.53 mGy. The mean effective dose ranged from 0.10 mSv to 2.15 mSv for lumbar spine AP and ranged from 0.04 mSv to 0.22 mSv for lumbar spine LAT. The results obtained in this study were higher than the doses reported in UK 2010 review in some health care centers. The higher doses obtained can be attributed to the use of higher tube load (mAs) during examinations, which shows lack of  optimization of exposure settings.

 

Biography:

Dr. Lia Margolin has a Ph.D. in Theoretical Nuclear Physics and Computational Mathematics from Tbilisi State University, Georgia. She has published more than 25 papers in international peer-reviewer journals and has been awarded International Science Foundation (ISF) grant for her research accomplishments in Theoretical Nuclear Physics. She is an Associate  Professor of Mathematics and Mathematics Department Chair at Marymount Manhattan College in New York City, NY. She serves at the Internaional Research Conference Scientific and Technical Committee as a member of Editorial Review Board on Nuclear and Quantum Engineering.

 

 

Abstract:

One of the important problems that arise when investigating dynamics of Few-Body Nuclear systems within the framework of the Hyperspherical Function (HF) Method, is the problem of constructing wave functions that are anti-symmetric under particle interchange. Parentage scheme of symmetrization (PSS) allows to construct N-body symmetrized  HF from functions with arbitrary quantum numbers by the use of the transformation coefficients related with the permutations of last two particles. N-body HF corresponding to the representation of the N-particle permutation group were obtained for N=3,4,5,6 by finding parentage coefficients and constructing linear combinations of the N-particle functions corresponding to the irreducible representations of N-1 particle permutation group . However, construction schemes for the fully anti-symmetric  wave functions, consisting of spin and isospin parts along with the hyperspherical parts, has not been systematically addressed in the literature. Solution of this problem becomes sufficiently complex as number of particles increases. This article develops construction schemes for four particle  wave functions that are anti-symmetric under particle interchange by building all possible combinations of spin, isospin, and hyperspherical parts. It is demonstrated that there are sixteen possible ways to construct fully anti-symmetric four-body wave functions when spin and isospin parts are represented by [4], [31], and [22] representations of four-particle permutation group . A complete set of fully anti-symmetric four-body wave functions is obtained for both (3+1) an (2+2) configurations. Proposed construction schemes can easily be generalized for the systems with any number of particles.

 

Swagatam Sen

PhD, Indian Statistical Institute, India

Title: Galaxy Rotation Curve Anomaly and Complex Spacetime
Biography:

Swagatam Sen is a mathematician and statistician with Masters’ degree in Statistics from Indian Statistical Institute which was awarded to him in 2005. Swagatam has had 15 years of experience in Data Science and related quantitative disciplines and is currently running Data Science unit for HSBC in Edinburgh. Aside from his regular profession, he is also an independent researcher in physics working on a number of areas in foundations of physics.

 

Abstract:

An alternative viewpoint has been achieved to explain observed anomalies in Galaxy rotation curves without requiring any dark matter existence. The explanation is rooted in a characterisation of spacetime as a Kahler manifold on complex 3 dimensions. Using this fundamental extension in our understanding of reality, It has been derived how the appropriate geodesics on that complex spacetime structure, along with field equations of General Relativity, would behave. Using these generic results, it has then been shown that with appropriate choice of metric one can allow for centrally concentrated density distributions that can generate flatter rotation curves. The concept then has been applied to rotation curves of 4 different galaxies to obtain required density distributions, which shows clear absence of any exterior dark matter halo. Instead all 4 galaxies exhibit a massively concentrated core with a fast diminishing negative energy field around it.